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Liberty in all its Forms

As a child, I would spend hours playing with my brother, driving our little cars along the arabesques of the Persian carpets of our home. Our first visual universe was made up of the expertly woven forms and colors created by the skilled artists of Tabriz or Kashan. Later on, when I moved to working in color, shadow continued to be a consistent presence and a major element in many of my compositions. It is not merely a geometric element in the frame, it has meaning. It is a veil which is voluntarily “placed” in the image, which invites the viewer to question, to come up with their own interpretation.
My camera and I, we like to write with shadow, color and light. Whether I am enjoying the privilege and pleasure of offering training in the language of images in

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Bringing the Drone War to American Skies


Featured today on The New York Times website, Tomas van Houtryve‘s project Blue Sky Days, shows America from a drone’s-eye view.
“Mr. van Houtryve bought his own drone online. He created a custom mount for his camera, and built a cable to link his camera to a video transmitter, so he could see the view from his camera.
His concept was simple: Take the idea of foreign drone strikes and instead target similar domestic situations, putting them under surveillance using his drone in public spaces. He made a list of hundreds of different strike reports, gleaning as many details about the circumstances.”
Read the full article on the Times’ Lens blog.
Van Houtryve will also be speaking about the project next week in New York City, details below.…
Tuesday, November 4, 2014
7:30pm — 9:00pm
The Penumbra Foundation

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Human Rights Watch: Palliative Care In Mexico

“Imagine you are experiencing the worst pain of your life. Now imagine that the only way to get the pain medication you need is to travel several hours on a rickety public bus, while you are in agony. That’s the reality for thousands of people every year in Mexico. But this suffering is unnecessary – and our video will help create momentum for change.” – Human Rights Watch (HRW)

 
In May 2014, HRW successfully completed a Kick Starter Campaign to fund the creation of a video to raise awareness about the lack of availability of palliative care in Mexico.  HRW’s Diederik Lohman teamed up with photojournalist and filmmaker Ed Kashi (VII…) to make this video happen. In early September the duo traveled to Mexico and document the story of Donia Remedios, 73, a pancreatic cancer patient,

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Photo Ark Reaches 4,000 Species

The Photo Ark has reached an important milestone! This pygmy squid from Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea, FL, became the 4,000th… species to be photographed by Joel Sartore.
A long-time National Geographic contributor, Joel began this project in 2006 to document every captive species on Earth. He travels to zoos, aquariums, private breeders and other wildlife centers to reveal the world’s magnificent and fragile biodiversity.
This pygmy squid (and the isopod riding on its back) are virtually unknown to the public. Through the Photo Ark, Joel hopes to show people “a world worth saving”. Without better awareness and stewardship, half of the planet’s species could be lost to extinction by the turn of the century.

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Delta’s Downhill Spiral

What more do you need to know about DELTA Airlines than the latest email to someone who is currently a Platinum flyer with them… i wonder if C E Woolman, the founder of “Delta Air Services” (and at whose desk the current CEO Richard Anderson sits everyday) would think this is the right way to go… basically telling 95% of the people who fly Delta to “Shove it…” today’s ‘explanation of the new Medallion Reward’ program begins:
” If everyone’s an Elite Flyer, then No One is…” Maybe they should just start a private airline for the 5% and not have them sully their presence with the vast majority of the flying public (who I admit are not necessarily prime hunks of humanity)… but there is something kind of insipid about that approach… From now on, it doesn’t matter how …

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The Art of Storytelling – Documentary Photography Workshop in Los Angeles


 
The Art of Storytelling
A 4 1/2 day Documentary Photography Workshop with Gerd Ludwig
In Los Angeles, October 23-27, 2014
$975
This 4 1/2 day workshop by National Geographic Photographer Gerd Ludwig is for photographers and serious amateurs who want to take their photography to the next level. It concentrates on the aesthetic, technical, and logistical aspects of photographing with personal vision and balanced objectivity. It is designed to help photographers develop a personal eye, and to leave feeling inspired.
HOW IT WORKS:…
Each participant should photograph a subject idea with the goal of producing a set of images by the end of the workshop. After individual portfolio reviews, Gerd will provide guidance to help streamline each idea, provide research tips, and create a coverage plan.
Throughout the workshop critiques will take place, both in groups and individually. In

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The Art of Storytelling – Documentary Photography Workshop in Los Angeles


 
The Art of Storytelling
A 4 1/2 day Documentary Photography Workshop with Gerd Ludwig
In Los Angeles, October 23-27, 2014
$975
This 4 1/2 day workshop by National Geographic Photographer Gerd Ludwig is for photographers and serious amateurs who want to take their photography to the next level. It concentrates on the aesthetic, technical, and logistical aspects of photographing with personal vision and balanced objectivity. It is designed to help photographers develop a personal eye, and to leave feeling inspired.
HOW IT WORKS:…
Each participant should photograph a subject idea with the goal of producing a set of images by the end of the workshop. After individual portfolio reviews, Gerd will provide guidance to help streamline each idea, provide research tips, and create a coverage plan.
Throughout the workshop critiques will take place, both in groups and individually. In

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Still Shooting for LIFE


Back in 1936, when Henry Luce bought LIFE magazine, and shaped it into America’s window on the world, one might have thought he had some sort of crystal ball. I mean, the magazine has had its share of ups and downs, once being shuttered for six years, then rebounding as a monthly from ’78 to 2000, then borne again for a brief period as a newspaper supplement. In between, it’s been special issues, yearly recaps, and now, quite successfully, a book publisher. I mean, the name fits. The estimable Mr. Luce was on to something. Ya just can’t kill it. Despite the gaps, and changes, various editors (with wildly disparate skills) and shifting business fortunes, it keeps putting out good stories, using ink on paper, and creating a real thing–a good book you can take home and put on the

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Hello, Mr. Anderson…


You’ve certainly become a bit of a household name, and face, via your folksy thank you videos that all Delta passengers are familiar with by now. And kudos on trying to make the process of “inserting the metal flap into the belt buckle” more entertaining. Love the triplet scenario in the emergency exit row.
Videos aside, you’re doing a nice job running Delta, you and all your colleagues. I find Delta service to be generally excellent, upbeat, and folks from the counter to the cockpit strive to please. Some of the planes are pretty old, but you’re making strides. A bunch of the airports are much nicer of late. (The iPads at LaGuardia are fun.)…
I’m just like all the other legions of folks who daily drag their fatigued buttocks down jetways and onto your planes. (I was going to

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Behind Closed Doors

The women came from different countries with the same dream:
to leave behind the poverty of their villages.


But instead of working as domestic help, they found themselves in a kind of prison,
employed by people who treated them like something less than human.
One was stabbed with a knife, another doused in boiling water, another raped and jailed.

Steve McCurry, best known for his work in war-torn countries like Afghanistan,
 documented the suffering of women from Indonesia,
Nepal and the Philippines who endured a myriad of abuses while
working for families elsewhere in Asia and the Middle East.

“They’re at the complete mercy of these people who see them almost like slaves:
‘You’re my property, you’ll do what I say,’” McCurry said.


“They go home, they’re disfigured, they don’t have money, 
and they’re psychologically scarred. 
They end up going …

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